Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile: Movie Review

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Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile: Movie Review

Ted at the library at University of Washington

Ted at the library at University of Washington

Frank

Ted at the library at University of Washington

Frank

Frank

Ted at the library at University of Washington

Samya Ahmed, J2 Reporter

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In the midst of watching the trailer for ‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile’, it crossed my mind… Was a handsome man like him capable of these crimes? With his wit, charm and innocent cries for help, you start to believe that this man couldn’t have killed these women.

Childhood heartthrob Zac Efron, from ‘High School Musical’ fame portrays Ted Bundy in this horrific tell-all story. You can really see how Bundy tried to depict himself as a hero. In this story, Bundy was portrayed as a charming, family man who couldn’t even hurt a fly. He truly believed he was innocent and made the world believe that too.

It all starts off with Ted meeting his future girlfriend Liz Kendall (portrayed by Lily Collins) in a bar at the University of Washington. From then on they were in a relationship for years, while he was simultaneously committing kidnappings and murders.

This film isn’t meant to glorify Ted Bundy, but to focus on his psychotic charade to commit these crimes and act like they never happened. Bundy got some sort of an endorphin rush by capturing and killing women in inhumane ways.

“Extremely Wicked” purports Bundy’s wicked story through the eyes of Liz Collins, his girlfriend of years and a single mother who met the infamous killer on a rare night in 1969.  The film really gets right to the hard parts of the relationship, instead of focusing on the sweeter more innocent parts of the developing relationship. At the beginning of the film Bundy is pulled over and is arrested, then picked out from at line up at the local police station by a victim of a failed kidnapping.

Throughout the film, you see that Bundy depicts himself as this humble. honest and innocent man that could never murder anyone, and that the evidence on him was planted by the police department “just trying to find a killer to put in jail.”

As the charges are piling up from different states in different years, Ted gets tired of his multiple defense attorney’s not proving that he is innocent like he needs them to. He decided to represent himself and fully defend himself to the jury.

The twist nobody was expecting was that Liz (who was deemed unaware of his crimes and supportive) was in fact the one who tipped the police off, after she saw the sketch that resembled Bundy. From there led the police department to arresting Bundy and later revealing his chain of crimes.

In the end of the film, Liz can’t go on with her life, with her job or with her love life unless Ted “releases” her. She felt emotionally crippled and until he admitted to her the truth about his crimes, she couldn’t continue on with her life feeling this way. She visits him on death row with her now teenage daughter and boyfriend at the time. She goes into the prison knowing what she wants and that she won’t be leaving without answers. She brings a file that a detective dropped off in the earlier years in their relationship when she was in full denial. She didn’t open the file which held crime scene photos that graphically shown what he did to a victim, for a decade. Ted being surprised to even be in the presence of Liz immediately smiles and tries to rekindle what was left of their relationship. Liz repeatedly asks Ted did he do these crimes, and even on death row he maintains his innocence. She asks him again, and again still Bundy denies. She begs Ted one last time to release her and tell her the deep and honest truth.

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