Staying in Touch with My Culture

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Staying in Touch with My Culture

Standing at the entrance to the National African American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Standing at the entrance to the National African American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Alasiah Winstead

Standing at the entrance to the National African American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Alasiah Winstead

Alasiah Winstead

Standing at the entrance to the National African American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Alasiah Winstead, J1 Reporter

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February, the month where African American history and culture are highlighted so that students and adults can be enlightened.

When you’re woke and plan to stay woke, where do you seek more knowledge? A museum, of course.

One of the newest museums in the Washington, D.C. is the National Museum of African American History and Culture.  I started my journey in the year 1400 learning about things I never learned in history class.  It spanned African queens and kings to the slave revolt and then the Samba Conspiracy.

It took about 30 minutes to enter the museum. It was overcrowded but that was to be expected because it is new. My first impression of the museum was that it was dreary.  It’s definitely not a first date museum unless you want some intellectual mind boggling conversation . It all was hard to take in all of the museum and it was overwhelming seeing more visuals of what they don’t show you in school.

The Emmett Till exhibit was the hardest because it was so realistic and undeniably a wake up call to all ages. I felt like I was there in the 60s feeling the pain of his closest family member because he was my age when he was killed. On a lighter note, you can see less saddening things like the Olympic part with people like Wilma Rudolph and Muhammad Ali.  There is so much to see that it will probably take more than one trip, but  if you ever go, be ready to learn and absorb information that could change your life. It’s definitely worth a visit.

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